Multidisciplinary

How to Establish an Interdisciplinary Team

In our guide, The Value of Interdisciplinary Thinking, Strength and Conditioning Coach Jason Tee reminded us that coaching is complex, and to effectively navigate and maximise it, we need to draw from a wide range of areas of knowledge and expertise. Assembling an interdisciplinary team (IDT), a collection of individuals with specialisms in different areas of participant development, is one way to effectively navigate this. This article explores how to go about setting up an effective interdisciplinary team

The value of interdisciplinary thinking

A coach needs to be responsive to the needs of the people they are coaching. As everyone is different and all their needs are unique, you need to draw on different areas of knowledge and experience to best support the individual in front of you.

State of mind: Understanding cognitive load in performance and injury rehabilitation

What makes an athlete’s motor skills fail when they need them most? Jason Tee investigates this phenomenon and reveals surprising and important implications for performance, injury prevention, and rehabilitation.

The effect of age on sport injury risk

Jason Tee explains how development impacts injury risk and examines how to support young athletes for life-long activity.

Improving compliance with injury prevention programs

Injury prevention is dull, but necessary. In most cases athletes would prefer to be doing something else. Here are some ideas based in behavioural psychology for how we can drive engagement!

‘How’ a multidisciplinary team worked effectively to reduce injury in a professional sport environment

This research investigated how a multidisciplinary team consisting of technical/tactical coaches, strength and conditioning caoch, physiotherapist and a sport scientist worked together effectively in professional team sport.